What is the cancellations policy for education courses?

The education sub committee have issued the following cancellation policy that comes into effect in relation to all Physio First education programme courses from January 2006.

Cancellation within:

20 weeks of the delivery date will produce a 75% refund

6 weeks of the delivery date will produce a 50% refund

4 weeks of the delivery date will produce no refund

Cancellation with short notice does have implications in that it can deprive other members of a place and can be the difference between making a course viable and non-viable

Where courses are full and a waiting list is in operation and an individual on that waiting list has been informed that a place has become available, a period of 7 days will be allowed for payment. If payment is not received within that period, then the place will be offered to the next person on the list. A place is not confirmed until payment is received in full.

Physio First reserves the right to change venue, cancel (or reschedule) a course at any time with full refund. In this case, course fees will be fully refunded to the attendee but Physio First is not responsible for travel, hotel or other expenses incurred.

Is there any advice about CPD recording for HCPC registration?

For those concerned about CPD recording for HCPC registration a simple approach is to record any key learning objectives achieved through continuing professional development. This could be from a course, or from reviewing a patients case or from reading an article in a journal. You may choose to use either Physio Firsts CPD portfolio or the CSPs Pebble Pad portfolio (both found on their respective websites). The aim of CPD is to underpin your current scope of practice so all key learning points should be recorded and related to the areas of your current clinical practice. It is sensible to record course attendance and possibly notes taken. At this time however the HCPC will only require your learning points and evidence to support your clinical practice. It is probably wise to go no further than the last five years in terms of certificates and record keeping, with the emphasis being on the last two years of practice. Once the HCPC CPD assessment process starts for physiotherapy it will occur every two years.

August 2012

What are the requirements regarding manual handling for physiotherapists in private practice?

The HCPC states there are no specific requirements but their standards of proficiency includes the following statement;-

“15.3 – know and be able to apply appropriate moving and handling techniques.”

The CSP state that they do not set requirements around the provision and frequency of such training as this is a workplace issue which should be covered by the employer’s or practice relevant policies. These requirements may vary, depending on a number of factors, including an organisation’s contractual requirements, the level of risk associated with the working environment, the profile of the patient caseload etc. 

They do set out extensive guidelines which also includes specific advice regarding Private Practice and this document can be downloaded by clicking on the following link and then logging in;-http://www.csp.org.uk/publications/guidance-manual-handling-physiotherapy

First aid & cardiopulmonary resuscitation training for physiotherapists in private practice

What are the requirements for first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation training for physiotherapists in private practice?

The HCPC and CSP do not set requirements around the provision and frequency of such training as this is a workplace issue which should be covered by the employer’s or practice relevant policies.

These requirements may vary, depending on a number of factors, including an organisation’s contractual requirements, the level of risk associated with the working environment, the profile of the patient caseload etc. 

What are the rules on first aid and CPR training for private practices?

The Health & Safety Executive (HSE) state that the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 and the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 place duties on companies and individuals to ensure that adequate provision is made for health and safety at work.

Employers must ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, the health, safety and welfare of employees and any others who may be affected by what they do.  To do this they must carry out a risk assessment of the work activities and put in place any measures identified to control the risk.

HSE’s role requires us to ensure that duty holders comply with the above legislation, however we do not prescribe in detail how that is achieved.  Because every undertaking is unique and diverse, the onus is on the duty holder to ensure that they comply with current legislation. 

Their website, www.hse.gov.uk, contains comprehensive health and safety information and guidance, which, if followed by those in industry, will ensure that such duty holders achieve compliance with the relevant legislation.

You may find the information at the following links useful for your enquiry:

 http://www.hse.gov.uk/msd/manualhandling.htm

 http://www.hse.gov.uk/risk/controlling-risks.htm

 http://www.hse.gov.uk/healthservices/moving-handling.htm

 Please note that whilst we are willing to give any help and advice we can HSE is not permitted to offer a health and safety consultancy service, any views given by us on the interpretation of the Regulations represent our best judgement at the time, based on the information available. Such views are not meant to be a definitive statement of law, which may only be given by the Courts. Accordingly we would always advise you to seek the views of your own professional advisors. 

You may also wish to contact your professional body for industry specific advice.

If you feel you need to engage the services of a health and safety consultant you may wish to visit the Occupational Safety and Health Consultants Register (OSCHR), which provides information about qualified health and safety consultants – see link for information www.oshcr.org/

Can someone tell me why I should pay >£100 for a discussion meeting about voluntarily setting up a possible group that will take away our professional autonomy with the introduction of care pathways?

Wendy’s Question - Can someone tell me why I should pay >£100 for a discussion meeting about voluntarily setting up a possible group that will take away our professional autonomy with the introduction of care pathways?

 

Hi Wendy

You may be asking one question about two things, so to make sure that I am hitting the right points, I will set both out – but please do come back to me if I have missed the point.

 

Rich Katz will be talking upon 2 separate but related things i.e.

 

  1. He will be our main guest speaker at our symposium on Friday 31st March (Education Day) where he will contribute to the symposium upon our investigation of the feasibility of a private physiotherapists’ cooperative i.e. a self-owned self-employed private physio business

 

  1. He will be a conference speaker on Saturday morning, where he will be talking about his network’s experience of care pathways

 

The two are separate but related. Separate in the sense that at the Friday Education Day symposium, he is unlikely to address anything to do with Care Pathways, save possibly in passing, but they have been a feature of his network. In his Saturday morning conference slot he will talk about his, and his network’s experience, of using care pathways in is 20+ years of frontline negotiations with private medical insurers.

 

 

So, back to the question, but to each specific partCan someone tell me why I should pay >£100 for a discussion meeting about voluntarily setting up a possible group that will take away our professional autonomy with the introduction of care pathways?

 

Why pay to attend?

Essentially, in charging for this event, our executive have had to take into account our need to try to ensure that this event self-funds and fits into the overall use of Physio First finances as we deploy our strategy and meet our goals.

 

This whole Goal 9 endeavour, of which our groundbreaking symposium is a part, is premised on “no guarantees” that it will work and so we have to budget responsibly to cover our costs. If it fails, it is unlikely to leave a substantial financial hole in our organisation whereas if it succeeds it will help to replenish some of Physio First’s reserve which has been invested in our pursuit of our Goals 1 to 9 and without which we could not have even contemplated this development.

 

Even our volunteer post holders who already contribute so much of their own time, energy and money (to include our executive committee and even members of our education subcommittee who are responsible for delivering our whole Education day), will have to pay to attend.

 

I hope this provides some more context to this aspect.

 

 

Back to the question … voluntarily setting up a possible group that will take away our professional autonomy with the introduction of care pathways?

 

The symposium’s learning outcomes are:

  • What a self-owned private physiotherapy business entity is
  • Why Physio First thinks that this is something that Physio First members should contemplate now
  • What the first one might look like
  • When the first one is likely to be established
  • Whether you should plan to become involved or not

and are absolutely not about setting up a group that will take away professional autonomy but rather about whether there is sufficient appetite among members to become involved in setting up their own self-owned business – most probably as a cooperative – through which to trade and seek to impact upon the current and future healthcare marketplace.

 

The reasons for considering this now are set out in our FAQs around this event: http://www.physiofirst.org.uk/asset/25523CB1-8CC2-4B7A-9AAB55CDC626036E.2AA0FD77-9DD5-43DD-977B238E1B44120D/

In overall terms however, the exploration within the symposium will be about “protecting” professional autonomy on 2 counts:

 

  1. From its de facto erosion by private medical insurers and commercial intermediaries who impose restraints upon the number of treatments that providers who join their networks, can provide based upon their own metrics which are really only around cost with absolutely no reference to quality.

 

Those private medical insurers and commercial intermediaries that are honest will agree that they have no validated ways of measuring quality of any provider (from surgeon to physio to any other healthcare professional) nor indeed of the services that they, as businesses, provide i.e. how can a customer tell which private medical insurer or intermediary is of better quality than another – they simply cannot!

 

  1. By enabling self-employed private physios to do it yourselves! Up until now, there has been no legitimate way of articulating how good you are – save by saying “my patients would not come back, if I were not good enough” – which is a very credible position to hold, but one that we think has an increasingly short life span – our reasons for thinking this are summarised in our lead article in our November Update i.e.

 

Why do we need this scheme?

Society and the healthcare marketplace in 2016 demand authenticity. Validated data can be turned into evidence of authenticity in so many ways.

 

In everyday life, we give and share data everywhere we go – from interactive fitness apps to retail reward cards and hotel loyalty discounts. In the healthcare marketplace, authenticity means being able to prove our cost effectiveness – our value for money. In our world as self-employed private practitioners, this is demonstrated by measurable quality treatment with outcomes. Please see our article, page 7, on quality and how it is becoming critical in the private healthcare marketplace.

 

Our reasons for believing that our healthcare marketplace “will” (not “may”) be subjected to scrutiny about quality, takes into account Physio First’s discussions with marketplace stakeholders – from private medical insurers, to commercial intermediaries, to members who are ambitious to expand – as these discussions have helped us to understand that they are all looking for objective ways of measuring and then commercialising “quality”.

 

The reasons these stakeholders include:

 

  • The 2014 Competition and Markets Authority repot on their investigation of theprivate healthcare market which concluded that “…  patients considering private healthcare did not have sufficient information available to them to make informed choices” and as a result forced the establishment of The Private Healthcare Information Network (PHIN) whose remit is to “… publish trustworthy, comprehensive data to help patients make informed decisions regarding their treatment options, and to help providers improve standards” – see link http://www.privatehealth.co.uk/industry/industry-organisations/the-private-healthcare-information-network-phin/
    • This currently only applies to private hospitals and consultants who work within them, but the direction of travel in the healthcare market is clear – we all have to be able to provide “… trustworthy, comprehensive data to help patients make informed decisions regarding their treatment options, and to help providers improve standards” – and this means standardised data collection that is validated by much more than ourselves.

 

  • Some marketplace stakeholders have already looked to create a “TripAdvisor” consumer type quality measure – see an example from an on-line commercial intermediary https://www.zesty.co.uk/ and click on the very short video about “How does Zesty Work?”

 

Obviously Physio First has been working away, with the University of Brighton and our anonymous and selfless members on our Data for Impact project that now provides enough validated and standardised data to enable our Physio First Quality Assured Practitioner scheme to be launched and which is fully described in the lead article in our November Update,  “QAP scheme launch”- http://www.physiofirst.org.uk/resource-library/novemebr-2016-now-is-the-time-not-to-miss-out-2.html – which as the article says, has “delighted and worried marketplace stakeholders in equal proportion “.

 

So back to care pathways?

For those of you who are Bupa providers, you have been asked year on year about your need to use care pathways. We even understand that Nuffield Fusion used to (and  perhaps still do – we would love to know) mandate the use of care pathways that they have developed for their Nuffield Physio outpatient Depts and Nuffield Fusion members, but apart from these there are very few if any Care Pathways that are regularly used in private practice.

 

Might care pathways be used in the future – the chances are that they might well be – but this then begs the question as to who will create them and what use will they put them to?

 

Currently we have detected little activity in the marketplace around Care Pathways – but rather a lot of activity around being able to demonstrate quality – but this does not mean that we can ignore them or the fact that they can be a sword as well as a shield. The question is, who will wield them?

 

This is why our Education subcommittee asked Rich Katz to talk about his experience with care pathways over his 20 plus years of experience i.e. giving us the benefit of his hindsight in their use in helping him to enable his network to survive and prosper in the US healthcare market where many others have not as it is a very harsh environment within which to compete!

 

More questions

Obviously there is an awful lot going on within Physio First just now – from the launch of our QAP scheme to our Goal 9 Symposium to our Patient On-line Booking facility (due to be launched in January). But they are all connected. 

 

They are all about “not standing still” and allowing other marketplace stakeholders to make the running and then merely on impact us and over which we would have very little say. These developments are about “Championing private physiotherapy” which means they are about big bold steps where we do not know the answers but without which we cannot expect to have much impact on our own marketplace.

 

So do continue to ask questions – and if I am involved in any of the answers – I promise to try to be “briefer” than I have been here!!!

 

Apologies and thanks!

 

Paul

Paul Donnelly

General Secretary

Physio First